Dunham Massey

I went on sunday 1st November for an afternoon here to take photos of the deer and surrounding gardens and house

from national trust website:

The house that stands today was built in the 1730s by George Booth, 2nd Earl of Warrington. At 19 he inherited a debt-ridden estate and a house in poor condition and dedicated his life to restoring its fortunes. He married a wealthy merchant’s daughter for her dowry, but the match was loveless and very unhappy.

He began the reconstruction of the hall in around 1715, creating an unpretentious modern home and his shrewd investments included the purchase of exceptional quality silver, fine furniture and paintings. He planted thousands of trees in the park in the design which remains today. Dunham was left to George’s only child, Mary, who had a happy marriage to Harry Grey, 4th Earl of Stamford.

Leaving and returning

Dunham continued to be a home to the Grey family for several generations until the 7th Earl, who inherited from his grandfather at 18, married his second wife Catherine Cocks, who had been a circus performer. Local reaction to the marriage was so bad that the Earl and Countess moved to their estate at Enville in Staffordshire and Dunham was left empty or let to tenants for 50 years.

It was only in 1906, when William Grey, the 9th Earl, inherited Dunham and began transforming the hall into an elegant Edwardian home. He died in 1910 and as his young son, Roger, the 10th Earl, was under-age, the management of the estate was initially taken over by William’s widow, Penelope.

Roger Grey was a popular landlord, he took great care of the estate and his tenants and throughout his life he tried to reacquire many of the works of art that had been removed from Dunham in the 19th century. On his death he bequeathed the house, all of its contents and the 3000 acre estate to the National Trust.

Dunham massey also became Stamford House – This was an important, but brief, part of Dunham’s history, when the house became a First World War auxiliary hospital from April 1917 to January 1919.

http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/dunham-massey/history/article-1355824892027/

the images i took are below, including some taken on film which i have scanned into my PC direct from the negatives

DSC_0145 DSC_0002 DSC_0008 DSC_0017 DSC_0021 DSC_0026 DSC_0031 DSC_0033 DSC_0035 DSC_0046 DSC_0047 DSC_0055 DSC_0059 DSC_0064 DSC_0071 DSC_0080 DSC_0085 DSC_0092 DSC_0096 DSC_0099 DSC_0109 DSC_0110 DSC_0111 DSC_0115 DSC_0117 DSC_0133 DSC_0140 DSC_0142 DSC_0143 2015-11-02_19 2015-11-02_20 2015-11-02_0 2015-11-02_4 2015-11-02_5 2015-11-02_6 2015-11-02_11 2015-11-02_12 2015-11-02_14 2015-11-02_18

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