Final Images Evaluation- Studio

Morocco Ale Beer Bottle
This image I felt works well as it creates a good low-key image, using studio lights with a softbox on each at either side of the bottle on a low power flash. If I had more time to make this photograph again, I would take more care and time to get the light on both sides of the bottle even and against the very edges of the bottle, from this I have learnt how to control light in a studio setting and how to try and make the most out of the product I am photographing.

Portrait of Sean Taylor
In making this photograph I was aiming to produce a high key image but introduce some shadow to the subject as well to make Sean look more defined, I feel I have done this well by using studio lighting on a high setting and a light either side of him with one to the side of the camera on a lower power. If I was to re-do this image I feel I would still shoot it the same way, but take even more time over the positioning of the lighting and of the model. From this shoot I learnt more on how to control lighting to suit the photographic need in producing the final photograph.

Portrait of Vincent Grieve.
This being the first portrait shot I had taken in a studio setting I felt that the image worked very well using just one light from the side of Vincent to produce a low key look to the image. The main fault I found with this image was to not take care of how the background looked, and catching the side of the infinity curve on the wall behind. To retake this photograph again with what I have learnt from this would be to move the model more to the centre of the studio and re-take it without the curve being present in the image.

Oil on CD
This photograph I produced at home using torch light controlled onto the subject to create a spectrum of colours shining off the compact disc and spots of oil and water on the cd. From this photograph I have learnt that for some images you have to control the light very carefully to produce the photograph that you want to make.

Dagger

This photograph produced in the studio at university I felt went well using one studio light low down with a snoot and honeycomb on to produce a more direct light onto the subject. I feel I have managed to show off the shape and material of the object very well in this photograph along with a reflection on the card below. If I was to retake this image again, I would try to use a more reflective surface underneath the object to increase the reflection and use the camera lower down at a more level angle to the dagger.

Dagger and Top Hat

This photograph I used two studio lights with an orange gel held in front of one to give the subject matter an orange glow whilst the other on low power just to define the hat and dagger slightly more. I felt this image works quite well however if I was to redo the photograph I would try to use a cleaner base for the objects as I feel this brings the quality of the photograph down. From taking this image I have learnt to make sure the whole of the photograph is clean and of a sufficient quality rather than just producing the photograph for the sake of taking a photograph.

Ships Lantern

For this photograph I wanted to try using film in the studio, I felt this worked well but was a steep learning curve on making sure settings were correct, I took a few images at various settings (bracketing) to make sure at least one photograph came out on the film as I wanted. I initially took a shot with my digital camera to check what settings I should be using and altered my film body from that to produce a darker or lighter image. Taking this photograph, it taught me how to use a film camera in a studio based setting along with developing skills in the darkroom. Whilst taking the photograph, I used two lights slightly in front and to the side of the lantern with a torch inside to show light coming through the glass panel on the front.

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